THE STATE of Jammu and Kashmir consists of three geographical zones - Jammu, a land encompassing plains, mountains and foothills; Kashmir, a mosaic of forests, orchards, rice fields, lakes and waterways; and the high altitude desert of Ladakh, its harsh austerity punctuated by green riversides and cloudless blue skies. Eah  of these regions  possesses a distinct culture that is reflective of its climatic conditions as well as its particular history. Jammu, once the  kingdom of the Dogra rulers, is a largely Hindu region renowned for its numerous shrines and courtly miniature paintings.  Kashmir`s motley artistic and literary traditions are the legacy of political domination by rulers of various religious  predilections - the Mauryans, Kushanas, Karakotas, Tibetans, Persians, Mughals, Sikhs and finally, the Dogra rulers of  Jammu - and interaction with the trading communities who passed through it. Kashmir has been a historical centre for the  scholarship and teaching of Buddhism, Vedic culture, Sanskrit, Shaivism, Islam, Sufism and Sikhism. It has also been  the focus of varied art patronage and consequently it has amalgamated Turkish, Persian and Mughal influences to   create its own art idiom. Due to its scarcity of resources and the presence of nomadic communities, Ladakh has  evolved craft practices that are informed both by the formative influences of Central Asian, Chinese and Tibetan cultures  as well as by the climatic conditions in which it is situated. Simultaneously, Ladakh also contains another cultural matrix  fostered by its predominantly Buddhist population and the patronage by its ancient monasteries. The art forms that    belong to this realm are thus closely related to the spatial and ritualistic requirements of the religion. 

  • Papier-Mache
  • Kaleen- knotted carpets
  • Kashidakari - Kashmiri embroidery
  • Namda - felted rugs
  • Gabba - embroidered rugs
  • Kani shawls
  • Woolen textiles
  • Walnut wood carving
  • Pinjrakari - latticed wood work
  • Wicker work
  • Reed mats
  • Copper ware